Why Hard-Selling Your Soft Skills Matters In An Interview

October 15th, 2018

Tired of being the ‘runner up’?

You have the right experience.  You have the right job skills.  You even have the right intangibles for the position.

So why are you always coming up with the “silver medal” – instead of landing the job you want?

It could be because you aren’t adequately explaining why you’re the best cultural fit for the job.  Most people find it easy to explain how their job skills and experience are a great match.  But few are able to show how their soft skills make them the best candidate – and therein lies an opportunity for you to separate yourself from the crowd.

So in your next interview, don’t be another me-too candidate who describes himself as an “outgoing team player with excellent communication skills.”  Skip the cliches, and find more vivid, memorable ways to hard-sell your soft skills.

Identifying Top Soft Skills

Plan ahead.  Learn everything you can about the company’s mission, vision and corporate culture.  Study the position description, looking for clues about the types of skills needed to interact effectively with others in this role.  Compile a list of the top four or five soft skills required.  Then, think back through your job history to find evidence that demonstrates you possess those skills.

Use a three-step process.  Rather than just reeling off a long list of soft skills in your interview, use anecdotes and experiences that clearly demonstrate them.  Experts recommend that you:

  1. Briefly describe the situation;
  2. Tell what you did specifically;
  3. Explain the positive result or outcome.

Don’t fake it to land the job.  Stay true to yourself – and your natural personality style – when selling your soft skills.  If you say you have a certain type of work ethic or management style (just because you think that’s what the interviewer wants to hear), be aware that this could backfire.  In the long run, you’ll need to actually demonstrate the skills to which you’ve laid claim.  Misrepresenting your soft skills in the interview could eventually cost you the job.

Looking for Your Next Professional Career Opportunity?

Send us your resume today.  Our team of recruiters will listen to your needs, match you with a perfect career opportunity, and then show you how to effectively sell your soft skills in the interview.

Professional Search Services: What Shoes Are You Trying To Fill?

October 3rd, 2018

ABR Employment Services, a Wisconsin based staffing agency serving the Midwest, has spent the past 30 years honing its unique ability to serve clients in a best practice approach garnering accolades and awards along the way. Jim McNett, Chief Executive Officer, has spent 20 of those years personally overseeing the strategic development of ABR. McNett takes pride in what he describes as the organization’s organic growth. “We are known for customer service excellence,” he shared. And, in a bid to continue ABR’s growth, the organization recently added a professional search division in order to meet increasing demands outside of its traditional service offerings.

Meet ABR

Headquartered in Madison, ABR has 12 operating units, including a presence in MN. The long-established staffing firm provides staffing support for manufacturing, skilled industrial, HR, professional office support, logistics, scientific lab, and accounting positions.

 Additionally, ABR acquired Kinsa Group a decade ago, a recruitment agency with a national presence specializing in executive placement in the food and beverage industry.

ABR has received the Best of Staffing™ Award eight years in a row and is the only Wisconsin staffing agency with multiple branch locations to receive the Double Diamond Award. And Kinsa Group was recognized this year as one of Forbes’ Best Professional Recruiting Firms.

Growing Professional Search

Yet with all of the growth and successes, McNett knew they could do more. “We determined over the last few years that there was a huge need for professional to mid-level management positions that was a missed opportunity,” he explained.

ABR has built its base on filling support positions, both in the manufacturing and office settings. “You’re talking pay rates of $11 to $20 an hour—non-exempt, hourly positions,” explained McNett. “Then you have Kinsa Group that is doing managerial to executive searches—$90,000 to $200,000+ salaries.”

But these polar opposite roles left gaps. ABR clients are successfully filling warehouse and administrative positions, but aren’t receiving assistance for higher level openings. On the flip side, Kinsa Group is turning out executive level candidates, but can’t fulfil mid-level requests. “They would get a request for a $60,000 Production Supervisor but that would be below their level,” said McNett. “They don’t do that.”

These gaps meant that recruiters were turning down hundreds and hundreds of jobs from clients. “They weren’t quite in our funnels,” McNett explained. “This was a lot of lost revenue and our clients were going elsewhere when we knew we could probably do this ourselves with focused recruiters with the right skills.”

McNett rolled out a strategic plan and began a testing phase with a recruiter specifically working these jobs that had previously been lost in the gap. He quickly found that the need was greater than they had originally thought. “In talking with clients, we determined there really was a need for that mid-level, $45,000 to $80,000 salary realm,” shared McNett. “There was really no one doing well with that. There were some trying to do it, and big exec groups saying they were doing it, but they really didn’t want to spend time on it.”

But ABR is willing to spend the time and put forth the effort, and testing paid off. “We had great success in finding and placing these people,” McNett shared. “We decided to move forward and to brand a separate division that can really complement what ABR and Kinsa Group is doing and that can provide our clients a full array of services to get them anything they need, from entry level to executive level, through one resource.”

Goals

The professional search division is kicking off with two recruiters who are officially targeting the $45,000 to $80,000 salary range of professional to mid-level manager positions. McNett hopes to be at full staff by the end of the year—a team of four—with revenue that supports that goal.

“We will start out primarily as a recruiting partner in the Midwest,” he added. “But I hope to see us expand that footprint outside of just the Midwest in two to three years.”

Within a few weeks of launching the division, the recruiting team has placed a Production Supervisor, Assistant General Manager, Quality Manager and Manufacturing Engineer. The team has also experienced an in-flux of inquiries and resumes from candidates actively searching for their next professional opportunity.

Ultimately, McNett would like to see ABR Professional Search as a comparable and complimentary division to Kinsa Group and to become known as a national recruiting partner at the professional to mid-level manager sector in the way that Kinsa Group is seen at the executive level in the food and beverage industry.

“We are all part of the same company,” he concluded. “We are a very cooperative organization set on success.”

What Shoes Are You Trying To Fill?

Seeking exceptional professionals or managers to build your team? Tell us you are interested in starting a conversation with us below, or call us at 608-268-2266.

3 Behaviors That Erode Organizational Trust

October 1st, 2018

Considering the number of articles, books, and lectures that have emerged in recent years about how building positive workplace cultures and a better employee experience can have a positive impact on business goals, one might expect organizational trust to be on the rise. But a recent study by EY found that “less than half of global respondents have a ‘great deal of trust’ in their employer, boss or team/colleagues.”

With such a strong recent focus on employee experience, why is there still a disconnect between leaders’ and employees’ perceptions of trust? Improving trust takes more than implementing a new culture initiative. It requires building strong relationships in the workplace—a process that takes time.

Organizations can facilitate relationship building, but they need to watch out for behaviors that can sabotage those efforts. If unrecognized and unchecked, those behaviors can actually erode organizational trust rather than strengthen it.

CUTTING CORNERS TO ACHIEVE GOALS

Thanks to technological advances, business now moves faster than ever before. Regrettably, operational speed can have a negative impact on how employees perceive trust. Rob Seay, employee experience director at Bonfyre, points out that in their pursuit of a goal or deadline, leaders might delay other projects—and “the initiatives that get pushed aside or overlooked to achieve those goals are often things that have an impact on the employees’ view of trust . . . such as team-building activities, training courses, special projects, or team meetings.”

Working toward a shared company goal can build trust among coworkers. But cutting culture- and relationship building initiatives in order to meet that goal when resources are scarce may have the opposite effect: the organization not only undermines its efforts to build organizational trust but actually erodes it. Prioritizing speed to the point that employees feel they are juggling (and even dropping) basic tasks for an extended period of time can leave them feeling more like operational assets than valued team members.

DISCONNECT BETWEEN WORDS AND ACTIONS

In the EY survey, respondents identified “delivers on promises” as the most important factor that determines whether they have “a great deal of trust” in their organizations. When dealing with customers, many companies use the “under-promise and over-deliver” strategy to ensure higher success rates in hitting their deadline, quality, and budget goals. But they often fail to apply this practice to their own employees and, consequently, harm that relationship. Leadership coach Peter Stark points out that when a company offers only “vague promises about bonuses or promotions that never materialize, [its] employees feel deceived and begin to lose trust.”

In his book, Everybody Matters: The Extraordinary Power of Caring for Your People Like Family, Bob Chapman writes about how he discovered discrepancies between his leadership’s behavior and the principles of trust he wanted his company to embrace.

When he learned that manufacturing supplies were locked away in cages due to fear of employee theft, he decided to remove those locks and eliminate several other practices that were misaligned with his organization’s new principles and undermined trust with its employees.

Failure to follow up on solicited employee feedback is another common complaint, especially when it comes to employee engagement surveys. By ignoring the results of those surveys, companies may be doing more damage than they realize to their corporate culture. In order to improve organizational trust, organizations need to listen to and respect what their employees tell them.

INSUFFICIENT OR DELAYED COMMUNICATION

Fifty-nine percent of respondents in the EY study cited whether an employer “communicates openly/transparently” as a factor in determining the level of their trust. The lack of clear and timely communication can undermine trust in any relationship.

Waiting too long to answer employees’ specific questions can allow false theories to brew in the workplace. To build trust with employees, Seay says, rather than stay silent, companies should instead share an incomplete message (without all the details) as a sign of support for transparency. This can be as simple as an announcement letting employees know the current state of affairs with a promise to provide more details as they become available.

When an organization commits to building organizational trust, it’s vital that its initiatives align with the words and actions of its managers and leaders. Trust doesn’t develop overnight or with a single new culture initiative; rather, it takes time to build workplace relationships that will lead to trust among coworkers.

By considering (and avoiding) these three problem areas, companies can develop effective trust-building initiatives.

IN A LESS THAN TRUSTING RELATIONSHIP?

In a less than trusting relationship with your current employer? Our team of professional recruiters at ABR Employment Services will help connect you with new opportunity!

Editorial Note: Portions of this blog originally appeared in the September, 2018 edition of ABR Employment Services magazine, ABR HR Insights

OSHA Temporary Worker Initiative Updates: Bulletins 8 & 9

September 24th, 2018

Respiratory Protection, Noise-Hearing Protection

The Occupational Safety and Health Agency recently released two new Temporary Worker Initiative (TWI) Bulletins –  TWI 8 (Respiratory Protection) and TWI 9 (Hearing Protection) .

Both cover client (‘host employer’) and staffing agency responsibility when it comes to respiratory protection and noise hearing protection.

Join Forces with Your Staffing Agency to Protect Temporary Workers

Anytime you bring a temporary employee to your office or warehouse, it is critical that you ensure their safety, just as you ensure for your permanent staff. As the host employer, you must work with your staffing agency to provide a safe work environment, pursuant to the requirements of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (the OSH Act). Coordinating efforts to make sure the temporary employee has access to the same health and safety training, as well as updated information as available, benefits both the professional employment agency and your organization. You, your staffing team, and your employee can work together in confidence that you have covered all the safety bases.

OSHA Provides Regular Updates to Help You Maintain Workplace Safety Compliance

Staying informed of all updates provided by OSHA gives you the inside track toward keeping your temporary team members safe, allowing you to reduce and eliminate hazards before they can wreak havoc and cause injury or illness.

ABR Employment Services offers a basic safety overview to all new temporary employees before sending them to a client’s—or host employer’s—work site to help temporary workers understand strategies they can use to stay safe.

Your part of the joint responsibility greatly relies on your organization’s safety leader regularly monitoring OSHA’s frequent requirement updates, providing the necessary information and training recommendations for permanent and temporary employees, and enforcing regulation compliance for everyone.

The TWI Serves to Help the Staffing Agency and Host Employer Stay Current on All Health and Safety Issues

OSHA provides a special series of updates for temporary workers, which the national health and safety body refers to as the Temporary Worker Initiative (TWI). The TWI serves to help the staffing agency and host employer work together for seamless health and safety.

Questions? Let Us Know

If you have additional questions about these TWI updates, or any other workplace safety concerns or questions, contact your staffing representative at ABR for clarification and peace of mind. We appreciate our partnership with you in keeping our temporary workers safe.

 

Workplace AI: Friend or Foe?

September 17th, 2018

Click Image To Read

Feature Article Focus: Workplace AI

In every edition of our HR Insights Magazine, influential and wide-ranging thought leaders in HR, recruitment, staffing, management, and other fields discuss themes that are relevant to our clients’ businesses. The subjects differ from issue to issue, of course, but they are always connected to the latest industry news and trends. In this edition we help you prepare for the future now.

Use Workplace AI To Improve Security, Services, Productivity & Satisfaction

In this issue’s feature, “Get Ready for AI to Change the Workplace,” Nicholas McQuire describes how organizations can use artificial intelligence technology to improve their security and services as well as employee productivity and satisfaction. “Companies that want to benefit the most from the shift toward more AI in the workplace,” he writes, “should start preparing now—not later—for its arrival.”

Advantages & Pitfalls of Certain Workplace AI Functions

Another contributor, Rebecca S. King, also turns her thoughts toward what happens when tech applications replace some of the tasks that have been traditionally fulfilled by humans. In “Replacing Human Managers with Programming in the Gig Economy,” she examines what a case study of one automated platform reveals about the advantages (and pitfalls) of growing use of AI for certain managerial functions.

It is impossible to stop the future. But it is possible to prepare for it. Are you ready for what is coming?

Great Ideas & Partnerships Begin With A Conversation

We’re here to help you prepare for your organization’s future! Contact any of our locations to get the dialog going.

Candidate Ghosting: How Can You Prevent It?

September 12th, 2018

Candidate Ghosting Prevention

Are potential employees continuing to disappear while in the middle of your recruiting process? You’re not alone. So what can you do to keep from getting ‘ghosted’ by job candidates?

Candidate Ghosting Reasons and Remedys

According to Strategic Human Resources, Inc., candidates are more prone to drop out of the talent acquisition process due to the image that you’re portraying as an employer online.

In a world where we are inundated with different messages and forms of communication, what can you be doing to help yourself stand out from the crowd of employers on Indeed or ZipRecruiter? Try following a few of the steps below.

Make Social Media Your Friend

Perhaps you are one of the employers who isn’t sure social media is for them. Maybe your industry or services don’t lend well to social media, or you’re just not comfortable dedicating what could be 40 hours a week to your followers on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter or Instagram. However, consider this: 18.2% of referral makers ages 25-34 won’t refer a provider (or in this case, an employer) if they are not on social media. If you’re in the process of trying to catch the next wave of employees, consumers, or influences, you’re going to be caught in the surf without some form of active social media presence.

Create an Encouraging Culture of Communication

By remaining in consistent communication with your candidates, you can begin to build relationships that create a sense of responsibility in the candidate to reach out if they’ve changed their mind. But this responsibility goes both ways. When surveyed by CareerArc, over nearly 60% of candidates reported a poor experience with an employer or recruiter. Imagine the impact on that 60% if those responsible for the direct recruiting remained in contact with their candidates, keeping them updated on where they stood in the process. In the same study, 72% percent of those respondents said they shared their negative experience online or with someone directly. By cultivating a culture of communication between the employer and the potential employee, you can present an attractive image to candidates – one candidates want to be involved with

Don’t Hide

Similar to the fact that you should be active and involved in the public eye of social media, you should be actively approaching negative comments that may come out from behind a far-away keyboard. In a world that revolves around constant and instant communication, bad news can travel fast, and negative reviews can have a quick impact. In fact, USA Today recently reviewed a case where Yelp.com won a lawsuit against a local law firm that had received a negative and harsh review by a Yelp user, damaging their business reputation. When dealing with negativity in your web presence, a quick, factual and polite response will show potential employees (and potential customers) that you are an outstanding partner in the whole process.

We’re Not Afraid Of No Ghosts

Even before social recruiting was common practice, ABR Employment Services embraced it, as well as the 3 tips outlined above. As such, we’ve built, and continue to build, a community of trust among the people we help connect to employment. For candidate ‘ghost slaying’ support, reach out to any ABR location for assistance.

Editorial Note: Portions of this blog originally appeared in the September, 2018 edition of ABR Employment Services enewsletter, ABR HR Insights. It has been edited and was originally written by Robin Throckmorton of Strategic Human Resources Inc.

ABR Launches Professional Search Services Division

September 10th, 2018

 

Professional Search Services

Hire Professionals to Managers Faster & More Cost Effectively

ABR Employment Services, a leading employment agency specializing in professional office support and manufacturing announced today that they have launched a Professional Search Services Division.

ABR’s Professional Search Division specializes in the recruitment of exempt level professionals to management level talent in most industries and job disciplines within the U.S. Focused on helping employer’s access better talent, create exceptional candidate matches, shorten time to hire, and reduce cost and hiring risk, the division was created in response to client needs.

The addition of the Professional Search Division allows ABR Employment Services and Kinsa Group, ABR’s Executive Search Division, to offer a full array of recruiting and staffing services. Clients and businesses now have the ability to utilize a one-stop resource to recruit and staff for entry level to top executive positions.

“With a tight labor market and growing economy, finding the right recruiting partner is critical to success,” said ABR’s CEO, Jim McNett. “We have the experience, skills and tools to proactively source highly qualified professionals and managers needed to fill critical roles.”

About ABR Employment Services

Founded in 1987, ABR Employment Services provides professional search, professional office support and manufacturing employment opportunities to job seekers and staffing solutions to companies throughout Wisconsin and in Winona, MN.  ABR was ranked #50 on the Forbes, Inc. 2017 Best Professional Recruiting Firms list. In 2018, Kinsa Group, a division of ABR, was named to the Forbes America’s Best Professional Recruiting Firms list. ABR is an eight-time recipient of Inavero’s Best of Staffing® Award.

Find Top Talent

Seeking exceptional professionals or managers to build your team? Tell us you are interested in starting a conversation with us below, or call us at 608-268-2266.

 

 

September 2018 Career Webinars on ABR Job Connect

September 4th, 2018

How do I negotiate the best salary? How do I find an unadvertised job? What are the pros and cons of contract positions? We’ll answer these frequently asked questions from job seekers this month during our free webinars.

How to Find Jobs that are Not Advertised


Date: Thursday, September 6th
Time: 3:00 pm EST (11:00 am PST, 12:00 pm MST, 1:00 pm CST)

 

Description: 
If you are answering job board ads or website postings, your resume or CV in one of the hundreds of responses companies receive. But, how do you find jobs that are not advertised so there is not so much competition? This session will cover that topic as well as the following topics:

  • How to get your resume in the hands of hiring authorities
  • Networking activities you must do daily
  • Best ways to uncover jobs that are not advertised

Ignite Your Job Search with Confidence – Re-THINK You!


Date: Wednesday, September 12th
Time: 12:00 pm EST (9:00 am PST, 10:00 am MST, 11:00 am CST)

Description: It is time to re-invent your self-image, expand your self-concept, and ignite self-confidence. No matter what you are doing in life, it’s important to know how to effectively manage yourself on all levels; physically, mentally, and emotionally.

If you feel like job searching is a defeating or discouraging experience, make it a priority to join us. In this webinar, you will have the opportunity to:

• Shift your perspective to cultivate self-confidence
• Discover how easy you can change your self-image
• Learn strategies to help you powerfully manage emotions
• Build and strengthen your attitude – Be a Yes to You!
• How to access the courage, clarity and power already in you

Instead of defeat, you will see that you are already a WINNER! Come experience the shift for yourself.

What are the Pros and Cons of Working Contract Positions?


Date: Monday, September 17th
Time: 12:00 pm EST (9:00 amPST, 10:00 am MST, 11:00am CST)

Description: 

Have you ever thought about working as a Contractor, but thought that would hurt your career? Did you know that Contractors can make more money than individuals who work a traditional 40 hour a week job? Do you really know the pros and cons of working as a Contractor? During this session, we will address the following:

  • PROS of working as a contractor
  • CONS of working as a contractor
  • Why working Contract has become a popular choice for employment

Negotiate the Highest Compensation Package


Date: Tuesday, September 25th
Time: 11:00 am EST (8:00 am PST, 9:00 am MST, 10:00 am CST)

Description: 

You’ve been through several interviews, and just completed the final interview where the employer said they would be putting your offer together. Then it hits you that you never discussed money or benefits throughout the hiring process. You need a job, but can’t afford to accept something that is lower than your expenses, so do you wait and pray or bring up the topic of compensation before the offer is extended? That question and the following questions will be answered during this session:

  • How do you negotiate the best salary?
  • What areas can you negotiate in a compensation package?
  • What areas are not eligible for negotiations?
  • How do you get the best compensation package without jeopardizing the job offer?

Equal Pay: Leveling The Gap On Gender Pay Inequality

August 20th, 2018

Understanding Equal Pay & the Impact You Can Have

Are you able to ask candidates for their salary history in your state or city? If so, you may not be for long. If you are hiring employees in California, Connecticut (effective Jan 1, 2019), Delaware, Hawaii (effective Jan 1, 2019), Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, and Vermont, you cannot ask the candidate’s previous salary history during the recruitment process. All of these states and additional municipalities are just the beginning. We will continue to see many more jump on board in the months and years to come.

Women Make Only 80 Cents For Every Dollar Earned By Men

The driver behind all of this is a focus on the gender pay gap and leveling the playing field on compensation for men and women. Did you know…

  • Females make only 80 cents for every dollar earned by men?
  • Woman graduates make 82% as much as their male counterparts?
  • Women on US Corporate Board of Directors is only 12%?
  • Women owned companies average 60% lower revenues than male owned companies?

(Source: PewResearch)

The unfortunate part is the pay gap follows women even into retirement. If a woman is paid less than her male counterpart during her working years, she’ll receive less income from Social Security, pensions, and other sources when she retires than the retired men, according to an article by Fischer & Hayes.

We’ve Come A Long Way, Baby?

The gender pay gap is real. As a society, we’ve been working on this issue since 1896. In 1963, the Federal Pay Equity Act went into effect. But still, the problem is the gap isn’t closing very quickly at all for being an issue for over 100 years. Some of the reasons causing this gap include the types of majors in college and jobs we’ve pushed women to take over the years. Plus, there is still a bias–whether overt or unconscious–about women in the workplace.

A recent Harvard Global Online Research study including over 200,000 participants showed that 76% of people (both men and women) are gender biased and tend to think of men as better suited for careers and women as better suited as homemakers. This bias spills over into the workplace every day. According to the Women in the Workplace Study by Leanin.org and McKinsey & Co., for every 100 women promoted to a manager level position, 130 men were promoted. Even at the C-level, women only account for 18% of the C-level employees.

All Too Familiar Biases

This same study found that women asked for feedback as often as men, but were less likely to receive it. Plus, women do not have the same level of access to senior leaders. You’ve probably seen it or maybe even done it yourself, but when a woman tries to negotiate they are considered bossy or aggressive.

Recently, I was approached by a woman to coach her through asking her employer for a salary increase because she knew she was paid substantially less than her peers who happened to be male. We walked through the facts including her credentials and performance reviews.  When she approached her manager with the information asking for the one time increase, she was denied and told salaries are based on the income you were receiving when you were hired. And, she was also told inquires like this could result in her termination. Yes, she is now actively looking for a new position with a company that respects the skills and performance she brings to the table.

More Work Needed To Level Gender Pay Gap

If we can find a way to even the playing field and eliminate the gender pay gap, our businesses will become more collaborative, more inclusive, and more competitive. As businesses, we need to evaluate our compensation philosophies as well as take a deep look at our internal employees to ensure we haven’t fallen into the pay inequity. We also need to look at our employment practices to minimize the impact of any hidden or overt biases that would be holding women back and/or paying them less for their skills than deserved. Look for ways in your organization to help grow and develop your women into leadership roles such as through mentoring programs and even training your employees to understand how biases can affect employees and the company’s success.

As individuals, especially in HR and management roles, we can make a difference, too. We need to be reflective to realize any of our own conscious or unconscious biases that may be impacting decisions we are making with regard to hiring, promotion, and compensation. And, we may have to step outside our comfort zone to speak up when we see inequality taking place.

Editorial Note: The content of this blog originally appeared in the August, 2018 edition of ABR Employment Services enewsletter, HR Insights. It has been edited for SEO and was originally written by Robin Throckmorton of Strategic Human Resources Inc.

CL&D Graphics, Sjoberg Tool Hiring Event

August 13th, 2018

CL&D Graphics, Sjoberg Tool Manufacturing Jobs

August 23, 2018 Hiring Event – 9 am to 12 noon – Oconomowoc Library

ABR Greater Milwaukee is hiring for CL&D Graphics & Sjoberg Tool on August 23, 2018 from 9 am to 12 noon at the Oconomowoc Library.

Opportunities include entry level manufacturing jobs starting at $13/hr to skilled manufacturing jobs that pay between $15-$17/hr. Jobs available on all shifts.

Job Description – CL&D

Machine Operator – 1st shift – $14/hour

Job Descriptions – Sjoberg Tool

General Production – unspecified shift – $13/hour

Robotic Welder Operator – 1st & 2nd Shift – $15/hour

Press Brake Operator – unspecified shift – $17/hour

Can’t Attend the Job Fair? Easily Apply Now