December Webinar Feature: Interview Preparation Tips

December 3rd, 2018

https://www.abrjobs.com/2018/12/03/interview-preparation-tips/Interview Preparation Tips

Seeking interview preparation tips? Looking to avoid future interview mistakes? You’ve come to the right place! We cover these topics this month during our free webinars. A live Q&A session will be held at the end to address your questions.

Re-THINK! Job Search Mistakes Even Smart People Make


Date: Tuesday, December 4th
Time:  11:00 am CST

Description: Re-THINK and Get Results! We are going to break it down, so you can see the Job Search Mistakes being made and more importantly how to turn these mistakes around, so you can get results.

Come ready to learn! This webinar is designed for smart people who are ready to get back to work. I have helped place thousands of people get hired for jobs they love, and I want to help you, so you too can land your dream job.

Here is a sneak peak of the mistakes we are going to Re-THINK:

  • Disempowered Thinking
  • Online Resume Submittal
  • Ineffective Networking
  • Low Self-Confidence
  • Not Being Clear
  • Lack of Preparation for Interviews
  • Not Fully Communicating Your Value
  • Lack of Commitment to Job Search Activity
  • Fear of Follow Up
  • Not Having Support

This will give you the confidence you need to get your job search into “high gear”. Say GOODBYE to these mistakes and let’s get you back to work!

Interview Preparation Tips: Outwit Your Competition 


Date: Tuesday, December 18th
Time: 11:00 am CST

Description:
 The most qualified person does not necessarily get hired, it’s the person who aces the interview. How can you PREPARE better than your competition, so you end up with a job offer? During this session, you will learn the following:

  • Nine specific steps to prepare for an interview
  • Additional tips to improve the results of your job search process

How to Handle an Uninformed Interviewer


Date: Thursday, December 27th
Time: 1:00 pm CST

Description: Have you ever been frustrated when you realize the person interviewing you doesn’t understand your credentials or the position, they are presenting to you? What can you do to turn this situation around, so you are considered for the job? During this session, we will address the following:

  • How you can be scheduled for a subsequent interview
  • How to turn this type of interview into your favor
  • Why it’s important to understand the priorities of this individual

HR Insights Magazine: Winter Issue

November 19th, 2018

Feature Article: ABR Professional Search

In every edition of our HR Insights Magazine, influential and wide-ranging thought leaders in HR, recruitment, staffing, management, and other fields discuss themes that are relevant to our clients’ businesses.

The feature article of this issue spotlights our professional search division. CEO Jim McNett explains how contingent and priority search services were created to in response to client needs for mid-level management positions.

contingent priority search

Great Ideas & Partnerships Begin With A Conversation

If you are having trouble finding your perfect candidate, take some time to reconsider how—and where—you’re searching for and evaluating them. They may already be in our database! We can help you reframe your search criteria and focus your efforts in new directions so you have more success in finding what you need. Get in touch with us now.

Workplace Inclusivity: There’s Still Work To Do

November 15th, 2018

We’ve Come a Long Way, Baby?

It seems hard to believe, but according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, women now make up 51.6% of the employees in “management, professional, and related occupations” in the USA. That’s a magnitude of change from how things were just thirty years ago! Pursuing greater inclusivity helps organizations hire and promote the best talent without being misled by biases, live up to the corporate value of fairness, and create work environments that engage everyone. Things are better today, but there is still plenty of work to be done to increase inclusivity in the workforce.

Fix gender imbalance in other roles

Women and men may be approaching equal representation in professional and managerial jobs, but what about other areas? Consider, for example, jobs such as a roofer, stonemason, crane operator, and carpenter, which are over 95% male; and jobs such as dental hygienist, speech-language pathologist, and early-childhood teacher, which are over 95% female. (And before tackling any of those, HR–in which women are overrepresented–should probably get its own house in order first.)

Tap other overlooked or underrepresented talent pools

Just as women have long been an overlooked talent pool, there are almost certainly other groups that are similarly under tapped. These might include groups that have faced discrimination, such as overweight people, for example, or people who are short, whose voices are a certain pitch, or who have some other characteristic that might elicit prejudice against them. Making this a priority is not only good for business but also helps companies promote fairness.

Help overlooked people in need

If the goal is compassion, then the inclusion movement might consider groups in need who are overlooked. For example, there are many people who are highly stressed because they have a close relative who suffers from addiction or a severe mental illness. These people typically soldier on without complaining. A worthy social responsibility goal for diversity and inclusion departments is to help these people in need.

Focus on individuals rather than on groups

Companies that want the best candidates need to stop overlooking people for appearance reasons (e.g., body shape, tattoos, fashion style) connected to stereotypes and assumptions about certain groups. Instead, the organization should make better use of assessment tools so that really hire the best person for the job–a practice that is both good for business and fair to candidates. Similarly, initiatives that actively promote environments in which all individuals get along may be more useful than initiatives that stress group-based cooperation.

Looking to add talent to your  workplace?

The award-winning Best of Staffing team at ABR Employment Services will help you add exceptional people to your team. Just tell us who your ‘ideal’ candidate is and we’ll do the rest.

Editorial Note: Portions of this blog originally appeared in the November, 2018 edition of ABR Employment Services magazine, ABR HR Insights. It  was originally written by David Creelman, CEO of Creelman Research.

OSHA Position Post-Incident Drug Tests & Safety Incentive Programs

November 8th, 2018

On Oct. 11, 2018, the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) sent a Standard Interpretation Memorandum to its regional administrators and to state plan designees clarifying its position on post-incident drug tests and safety incentive programs. According to the memo, such tests and programs are permitted if properly written and implemented.

Background

Federal law and OSHA regulations prohibit retaliation against employees for reporting work-related injuries and illnesses. In May 2016, OSHA published a final rule interpreting the retaliation prohibition broadly. The rule stated that some post-incident drug testing and safety incentive programs may deter employees from reporting injuries and illnesses, thus resulting in unlawful retaliation. It left employers uncertain as to when implementing such testing and programs could result in citations by the agency for alleged retaliation.

The October 2018 memo sets out OSHA’s new policy, stating that “[a]ction taken under a safety incentive program or post-incident drug testing policy would” not violate anti-retaliation requirements unless “the employer took the action to penalize the employee for reporting a work-related injury or illness rather than for the legitimate purpose of promoting workplace safety and health.”

Post-Incident Drug Testing

OSHA’s new memo specifically states that “most instances of workplace drug testing are permissible.” According to the agency, examples of permissible drug testing include:

• “Random drug testing”;

• “Drug testing unrelated to the reporting of a work-related injury or illness”;

• “Drug testing under a state workers’ compensation law”;

• “Drug testing under other federal law, such as a U.S. Department of Transportation rule”; and

• “Drug testing to evaluate the root cause of a workplace incident that harmed or could have harmed employees. If the employer chooses to use drug testing to investigate the incident, the employer should test all employees whose conduct could have contributed to the incident, not just employees who reported injuries.”

So employers may lawfully implement not only random drug testing programs, but also post-incident drug testing programs, as long as all employees whose conduct could have contributed to the incident – and not just the employees who were injured in the incident – are tested.

Safety Incentive Programs

OSHA’s new memo further notes that “[i]ncentive programs can be an important tool to promote workplace safety and health.” According to the agency, incentive programs that provide positive “rewards [to] workers for reporting near-misses or hazards” and encourage “involvement in a safety and health management system” are “always permissible.”

The memo also says “rate-based” programs that reward employees “with a prize or bonus at the end of an injury-free” period or evaluate managers “based on their work unit’s lack of injuries…are permissible…as long as they are not implemented in a manner that discourages reporting.” “[W]ithholding a prize or bonus because of a reported injury” is allowed “as long as the employer has implemented adequate precautions to ensure that employees feel free to report an injury or illness.” These precautions can include:

• “[A]n incentive program that rewards employees for identifying unsafe

conditions in the workplace”;

• “[A] training program for all employees to reinforce reporting rights

and responsibilities [that] emphasizes the employer’s non-retaliation policy”; and

• “[A] mechanism for accurately evaluating employees’ willingness to report

injuries and illnesses.”

This means employers may lawfully implement safety incentive programs if steps are taken to ensure employees feel free to report injuries and illnesses.

Bottom Line

OSHA’s new memo recognizes the value of post-incident drug testing and safety incentive programs if applied in a consistent and non-retaliatory manner. Employers should review their drug testing procedures and incentive programs for compliance with the agency’s new guidance.

The content of this blog originally appeared in our November 2018 e-newsletter, ABR HR Insights. It was written by David E. Dubberly, a member of Nexsen Pruet, LLC. See more workplace safety blogs here.

Job Search Tips & Job Search Support Webinars

November 1st, 2018

Looking for job search tips that work? Or wonder about how do you go about finding your passion? Ever think job post applications are a time-waster? Want assistance to  overcome barriers in your job search? You’ve come to the right place! We’ll cover all of these topics this month during our free webinars. A live Q&A session will be held at the end to address your questions.

Finding Your Passion


Date: Tuesday, November 6th
Time: 11:00 am CST

Description:  Since work is so much a part of our lives, we want it to be meaningful and fulfilling. Come find out why and how to get the answers you need to find your passion. During this session you will:

• Learn how to instantly build your self-confidence
• Learn the essentials needed shift your emotions empowering you toward your future
• Learn how to accelerate your success and how to stay on your path
• Learn how to eliminate unwanted habits and behaviors that are holding you back

Join us to discover your unique contribution and gain access to all the resources within you to fulfill your purpose with power. It will be energizing, inspiring, and fun!

 

Job Search Tips 2018


Date: Tuesday, November 13th
Time:10:00 am CST
Description: Finding a job is not rocket science, but it can be overwhelming if you are not obtaining results from your efforts. During this session, you will learn the following:

• What works in today’s job market
• How to get the attention of Hiring Authorities
• The importance of your Social Media Presence
• The dynamic duo of LinkedIn and Keywords

 

Are Applying to Job Postings Worth Your Time?


Date: Monday, November 19th
Time: 2:00 pm CST
Description: It’s important to spend your valuable time on activities that will provide you with the greatest chance of success in your job search. During this session, you will learn how to:

• Identify viable job postings
• Screen for red flags in job postings
• Determine Best Use of your Time
• Get your resume in the hands of Hiring Authorities

 

Overcoming Job Search Barriers


Date: Monday, November 26th
Time: 2:00 pm CST
Description: It is estimated that eight out of ten employees currently working would change their job if given a better opportunity. That is great news for someone like you who is conducting a job search. During this session, we will discuss some of the greatest barriers you are facing in your job search including the following:

• Social Media
• The Mental Game
• Over-qualified or Under-qualified
• Too Many Choices

Your Employment Connection to the Future
Our monthly free webinars are just one tool we offer people looking for work. Partner with us on your job search. We’ll help you get noticed by area employers that are hiring and provide personal support along the way! Contact any ABR location to get started.

Social Media Profiling In Hiring: Pros and Cons

October 29th, 2018

social media hiring

Using Social Media for Hiring

The rise of social media has created new opportunities and challenges in the workplace, affecting each and every department in different ways. The recruiting and HR departments are no exception, with businesses of all sizes increasingly looking to access candidates’ social media profiles when shortlisting.

However, with great power comes great responsibility and recruiters need to strike a fine balance in deciding how deep to go when tapping into social media data.

To get a thorough understanding of this dilemma, I spoke to Fiona McLean, CEO of The Social Index. With a background in both corporate hiring and HR, McLean is in the perfect position to shed light on the benefits and risks associated with social media profiling.

Why Tapping Into Social Media Profiles Makes Sense

McLean highlighted three key areas in which social media profiling can add value to the recruitment process:

First, using social media data to refine the information on file about a candidate enables recruiters to draw up a stronger short-list. They can also more accurately assess whether a particular candidate will be a good cultural fit or not. As covered in previous TalentCulture blog posts, creating a strong company culture is now a big concern for businesses of all sizes. Social media can be a powerful tool in matching talented employees with the compatible workplaces they are looking for.

Second, a candidate’s social media footprint can indicate how extensive their professional network is, as well as how engaged they are with their contacts. Although this is especially relevant in roles such as business development, being able to leverage employee connections can be valuable in many different organizations and roles.

Third, social media activity can also provide invaluable information about how a candidate deals with certain situations. For example, recruiters may seek to assess how they are likely to react during conflict or how empathetic they can be. This is potentially a valuable source of insight when assessing somebody’s suitability for a customer service role, for example.

The Dangers of Discrimination and Inconsistency

While the above points illustrate some of the many benefits of mining social media profiles during the recruitment process, McLean was eager to point out that there were also potential downsides.

One of the main issues of contention with social media research is where we draw the line when it comes to collecting data. It can be difficult to judge which data is relevant to a candidate’s prospective role and occupation and which is not. Getting this wrong can have serious implications.

For example, if a candidate has reason to believe that they have been denied an opportunity due to their ethnic background, religious beliefs or political ideologies then there is a real risk of a company being on the wrong end of a discrimination claim.

Another potential problem when looking at candidates’ social media profiles is ensuring consistency. Some people are more active and public than others in the social sphere, making it difficult to agree on a consistent and sufficient set of data to use when assessing suitability. A tried and tested methodology for assessment is needed to ensure a level playing field.

There is also the important issue of consent. How do recruiters communicate their social media research process and ensure that candidates are comfortable with that?

Setting Parameters With Social Research

According to McLean, recruiters should be actively looking to utilize social media research while minimizing the pitfalls highlighted above.

Companies already communicate the various stages of their recruitment process (e.g. interviews, selection criteria, assessments, etc.) and social media research can be incorporated into this. This should be clearly tied to the specific requirements of the business and job role to help put candidates at ease and secure consent.

Using a third party which specializes in collating and presenting relevant social media data for recruiters will also help to allay fears over potential bias and discrimination.

The upsides of using social media profiling in hiring suitable candidates are just too important for it to be left out of the recruitment process. Balancing social data collection with respect for boundaries and applying this research in a clear and consistent manner is a task all recruiters need to be engaged in.

Put Our Award Winning Recruiters To Work For You

Utilizing social networks such as LinkedIn is just one element of our hiring process to deliver exceptional results. Partner with an eight-time Best of Staffing agency to help you find and hire great people!

Editorial Note: This blog originally appeared in the October, 2018 edition of ABR Employment Services magazine, ABR HR Insights. It has been edited and was originally written by Tony Restell, founder of Social Hire. 

Why Hard-Selling Your Soft Skills Matters In An Interview

October 15th, 2018

Tired of being the ‘runner up’?

You have the right experience.  You have the right job skills.  You even have the right intangibles for the position.

So why are you always coming up with the “silver medal” – instead of landing the job you want?

It could be because you aren’t adequately explaining why you’re the best cultural fit for the job.  Most people find it easy to explain how their job skills and experience are a great match.  But few are able to show how their soft skills make them the best candidate – and therein lies an opportunity for you to separate yourself from the crowd.

So in your next interview, don’t be another me-too candidate who describes himself as an “outgoing team player with excellent communication skills.”  Skip the cliches, and find more vivid, memorable ways to hard-sell your soft skills.

Identifying Top Soft Skills

Plan ahead.  Learn everything you can about the company’s mission, vision and corporate culture.  Study the position description, looking for clues about the types of skills needed to interact effectively with others in this role.  Compile a list of the top four or five soft skills required.  Then, think back through your job history to find evidence that demonstrates you possess those skills.

Use a three-step process.  Rather than just reeling off a long list of soft skills in your interview, use anecdotes and experiences that clearly demonstrate them.  Experts recommend that you:

  1. Briefly describe the situation;
  2. Tell what you did specifically;
  3. Explain the positive result or outcome.

Don’t fake it to land the job.  Stay true to yourself – and your natural personality style – when selling your soft skills.  If you say you have a certain type of work ethic or management style (just because you think that’s what the interviewer wants to hear), be aware that this could backfire.  In the long run, you’ll need to actually demonstrate the skills to which you’ve laid claim.  Misrepresenting your soft skills in the interview could eventually cost you the job.

Looking for Your Next Professional Career Opportunity?

Send us your resume today.  Our team of recruiters will listen to your needs, match you with a perfect career opportunity, and then show you how to effectively sell your soft skills in the interview.

Professional Search Services: What Shoes Are You Trying To Fill?

October 3rd, 2018

ABR Employment Services, a Wisconsin based staffing agency serving the Midwest, has spent the past 30 years honing its unique ability to serve clients in a best practice approach garnering accolades and awards along the way. Jim McNett, Chief Executive Officer, has spent 20 of those years personally overseeing the strategic development of ABR. McNett takes pride in what he describes as the organization’s organic growth. “We are known for customer service excellence,” he shared. And, in a bid to continue ABR’s growth, the organization recently added a professional search division in order to meet increasing demands outside of its traditional service offerings.

Meet ABR

Headquartered in Madison, ABR has 12 operating units, including a presence in MN. The long-established staffing firm provides staffing support for manufacturing, skilled industrial, HR, professional office support, logistics, scientific lab, and accounting positions.

 Additionally, ABR acquired Kinsa Group a decade ago, a recruitment agency with a national presence specializing in executive placement in the food and beverage industry.

ABR has received the Best of Staffing™ Award eight years in a row and is the only Wisconsin staffing agency with multiple branch locations to receive the Double Diamond Award. And Kinsa Group was recognized this year as one of Forbes’ Best Professional Recruiting Firms.

Growing Professional Search

Yet with all of the growth and successes, McNett knew they could do more. “We determined over the last few years that there was a huge need for professional to mid-level management positions that was a missed opportunity,” he explained.

ABR has built its base on filling support positions, both in the manufacturing and office settings. “You’re talking pay rates of $11 to $20 an hour—non-exempt, hourly positions,” explained McNett. “Then you have Kinsa Group that is doing managerial to executive searches—$90,000 to $200,000+ salaries.”

But these polar opposite roles left gaps. ABR clients are successfully filling warehouse and administrative positions, but aren’t receiving assistance for higher level openings. On the flip side, Kinsa Group is turning out executive level candidates, but can’t fulfil mid-level requests. “They would get a request for a $60,000 Production Supervisor but that would be below their level,” said McNett. “They don’t do that.”

These gaps meant that recruiters were turning down hundreds and hundreds of jobs from clients. “They weren’t quite in our funnels,” McNett explained. “This was a lot of lost revenue and our clients were going elsewhere when we knew we could probably do this ourselves with focused recruiters with the right skills.”

McNett rolled out a strategic plan and began a testing phase with a recruiter specifically working these jobs that had previously been lost in the gap. He quickly found that the need was greater than they had originally thought. “In talking with clients, we determined there really was a need for that mid-level, $45,000 to $80,000 salary realm,” shared McNett. “There was really no one doing well with that. There were some trying to do it, and big exec groups saying they were doing it, but they really didn’t want to spend time on it.”

But ABR is willing to spend the time and put forth the effort, and testing paid off. “We had great success in finding and placing these people,” McNett shared. “We decided to move forward and to brand a separate division that can really complement what ABR and Kinsa Group is doing and that can provide our clients a full array of services to get them anything they need, from entry level to executive level, through one resource.”

Goals

The professional search division is kicking off with two recruiters who are officially targeting the $45,000 to $80,000 salary range of professional to mid-level manager positions. McNett hopes to be at full staff by the end of the year—a team of four—with revenue that supports that goal.

“We will start out primarily as a recruiting partner in the Midwest,” he added. “But I hope to see us expand that footprint outside of just the Midwest in two to three years.”

Within a few weeks of launching the division, the recruiting team has placed a Production Supervisor, Assistant General Manager, Quality Manager and Manufacturing Engineer. The team has also experienced an in-flux of inquiries and resumes from candidates actively searching for their next professional opportunity.

Ultimately, McNett would like to see ABR Professional Search as a comparable and complimentary division to Kinsa Group and to become known as a national recruiting partner at the professional to mid-level manager sector in the way that Kinsa Group is seen at the executive level in the food and beverage industry.

“We are all part of the same company,” he concluded. “We are a very cooperative organization set on success.”

What Shoes Are You Trying To Fill?

Seeking exceptional professionals or managers to build your team? Tell us you are interested in starting a conversation with us below, or call us at 608-268-2266.

3 Behaviors That Erode Organizational Trust

October 1st, 2018

Considering the number of articles, books, and lectures that have emerged in recent years about how building positive workplace cultures and a better employee experience can have a positive impact on business goals, one might expect organizational trust to be on the rise. But a recent study by EY found that “less than half of global respondents have a ‘great deal of trust’ in their employer, boss or team/colleagues.”

With such a strong recent focus on employee experience, why is there still a disconnect between leaders’ and employees’ perceptions of trust? Improving trust takes more than implementing a new culture initiative. It requires building strong relationships in the workplace—a process that takes time.

Organizations can facilitate relationship building, but they need to watch out for behaviors that can sabotage those efforts. If unrecognized and unchecked, those behaviors can actually erode organizational trust rather than strengthen it.

CUTTING CORNERS TO ACHIEVE GOALS

Thanks to technological advances, business now moves faster than ever before. Regrettably, operational speed can have a negative impact on how employees perceive trust. Rob Seay, employee experience director at Bonfyre, points out that in their pursuit of a goal or deadline, leaders might delay other projects—and “the initiatives that get pushed aside or overlooked to achieve those goals are often things that have an impact on the employees’ view of trust . . . such as team-building activities, training courses, special projects, or team meetings.”

Working toward a shared company goal can build trust among coworkers. But cutting culture- and relationship building initiatives in order to meet that goal when resources are scarce may have the opposite effect: the organization not only undermines its efforts to build organizational trust but actually erodes it. Prioritizing speed to the point that employees feel they are juggling (and even dropping) basic tasks for an extended period of time can leave them feeling more like operational assets than valued team members.

DISCONNECT BETWEEN WORDS AND ACTIONS

In the EY survey, respondents identified “delivers on promises” as the most important factor that determines whether they have “a great deal of trust” in their organizations. When dealing with customers, many companies use the “under-promise and over-deliver” strategy to ensure higher success rates in hitting their deadline, quality, and budget goals. But they often fail to apply this practice to their own employees and, consequently, harm that relationship. Leadership coach Peter Stark points out that when a company offers only “vague promises about bonuses or promotions that never materialize, [its] employees feel deceived and begin to lose trust.”

In his book, Everybody Matters: The Extraordinary Power of Caring for Your People Like Family, Bob Chapman writes about how he discovered discrepancies between his leadership’s behavior and the principles of trust he wanted his company to embrace.

When he learned that manufacturing supplies were locked away in cages due to fear of employee theft, he decided to remove those locks and eliminate several other practices that were misaligned with his organization’s new principles and undermined trust with its employees.

Failure to follow up on solicited employee feedback is another common complaint, especially when it comes to employee engagement surveys. By ignoring the results of those surveys, companies may be doing more damage than they realize to their corporate culture. In order to improve organizational trust, organizations need to listen to and respect what their employees tell them.

INSUFFICIENT OR DELAYED COMMUNICATION

Fifty-nine percent of respondents in the EY study cited whether an employer “communicates openly/transparently” as a factor in determining the level of their trust. The lack of clear and timely communication can undermine trust in any relationship.

Waiting too long to answer employees’ specific questions can allow false theories to brew in the workplace. To build trust with employees, Seay says, rather than stay silent, companies should instead share an incomplete message (without all the details) as a sign of support for transparency. This can be as simple as an announcement letting employees know the current state of affairs with a promise to provide more details as they become available.

When an organization commits to building organizational trust, it’s vital that its initiatives align with the words and actions of its managers and leaders. Trust doesn’t develop overnight or with a single new culture initiative; rather, it takes time to build workplace relationships that will lead to trust among coworkers.

By considering (and avoiding) these three problem areas, companies can develop effective trust-building initiatives.

IN A LESS THAN TRUSTING RELATIONSHIP?

In a less than trusting relationship with your current employer? Our team of professional recruiters at ABR Employment Services will help connect you with new opportunity!

Editorial Note: Portions of this blog originally appeared in the September, 2018 edition of ABR Employment Services magazine, ABR HR Insights

OSHA Temporary Worker Initiative Updates: Bulletins 8 & 9

September 24th, 2018

Respiratory Protection, Noise-Hearing Protection

The Occupational Safety and Health Agency recently released two new Temporary Worker Initiative (TWI) Bulletins –  TWI 8 (Respiratory Protection) and TWI 9 (Hearing Protection) .

Both cover client (‘host employer’) and staffing agency responsibility when it comes to respiratory protection and noise hearing protection.

Join Forces with Your Staffing Agency to Protect Temporary Workers

Anytime you bring a temporary employee to your office or warehouse, it is critical that you ensure their safety, just as you ensure for your permanent staff. As the host employer, you must work with your staffing agency to provide a safe work environment, pursuant to the requirements of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (the OSH Act). Coordinating efforts to make sure the temporary employee has access to the same health and safety training, as well as updated information as available, benefits both the professional employment agency and your organization. You, your staffing team, and your employee can work together in confidence that you have covered all the safety bases.

OSHA Provides Regular Updates to Help You Maintain Workplace Safety Compliance

Staying informed of all updates provided by OSHA gives you the inside track toward keeping your temporary team members safe, allowing you to reduce and eliminate hazards before they can wreak havoc and cause injury or illness.

ABR Employment Services offers a basic safety overview to all new temporary employees before sending them to a client’s—or host employer’s—work site to help temporary workers understand strategies they can use to stay safe.

Your part of the joint responsibility greatly relies on your organization’s safety leader regularly monitoring OSHA’s frequent requirement updates, providing the necessary information and training recommendations for permanent and temporary employees, and enforcing regulation compliance for everyone.

The TWI Serves to Help the Staffing Agency and Host Employer Stay Current on All Health and Safety Issues

OSHA provides a special series of updates for temporary workers, which the national health and safety body refers to as the Temporary Worker Initiative (TWI). The TWI serves to help the staffing agency and host employer work together for seamless health and safety.

Questions? Let Us Know

If you have additional questions about these TWI updates, or any other workplace safety concerns or questions, contact your staffing representative at ABR for clarification and peace of mind. We appreciate our partnership with you in keeping our temporary workers safe.